History, Objects, Places

War Memorials

Mass Ave, Broadway, and Franklin Street form a narrow triangle at the eastern edge of Arlington Center. The short side of the triangle houses Arlington’s central fire station, a distinctive octagonal building. At the other end, the sharp point of the triangle, a 42-foot granite column stretches toward the sky.

It’s Arlington’s Civil War memorial, which the town installed in 1887 to commemorate Arlingtonians who died fighting for the Union. According to the Babcock-Smith House Museum website, the memorial is made of granite from Vermont, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.

The fire station flies the American and POW-MIA flag, visible in the image above; between the flags and the column is another memorial, which consists of a stone monument dedicating the memorial “to the heroic valor and patriotic spirit of the men and women in Arlington who served in the armed forces of the United States of America in all its wars.”

The Massachusetts seal/flag is carved to the right of the inscription. To the left is Arlington’s seal, which depicts the Revolutionary War memorial obelisk in Arlington’s Old Burying Ground.

Past that are glass cases protecting printed lists of Arlingtonians who fought and/or died in the United States’ many wars, organized by war. A pile of cannonballs sits alongside.

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History, Photos, Places

Arlington Center

Arlington Center is, as one might imagine, Arlington’s town center. Many of its governmental buildings and public resources are located here: the town hall and the main branch of the library, the housing authority, the farmers’ market. The main street, Massachusetts Avenue, runs through the Center, intersecting with Pleasant Street, which provides access to MA Route 2. The MBTA’s 77, 79, 87, and 350 buses serve the area. The Minuteman Bike Path crosses the main intersection. High traffic from both drivers and cyclists has caused some animosity between the two. In 2017, the town updated the lights at the main intersection and added a new crosswalk before the intersection as part of the Arlington Center Safe Travel Project and with the intention of making the Center safer and more navigable for pedestrians and cyclists.

Two of Arlington’s churches are here, the Highrock Covenant Church and the First Parish Universalist Unitarian church. Reminders of history, mostly colonial, are everywhere. Notable are multiple stone monuments commemorating moments in the American Revolutionary War, a nearly 300-year-old cemetery, two war memorials, a museum dedicated to sculptor Cyrus E. Dallin, a statue of Uncle Sam, and a 1911 statue by Dallin of a Native American hunter which acknowledges the indigenous people who lived here before colonists displaced them.

Arlington Center is also a retail hub. A number of restaurants and businesses, chains and locally owned, rent storefronts there. Some storefronts in the Center turn over frequently, likely in part because of rising rent prices. One ice cream store has gone through at least five iterations since the 1990s, housing the Ben and Jerry’s and JP Licks chains and some independent businesses. In 2018, it became Abilyn’s Frozen Bakery.

Many of the posts on this site are about places in Arlington Center. Check this link to see them all. If you’re visiting Arlington, the Center is a good place to start, especially if you’re on foot or on a bicycle. Come by some time.

Town Hall
First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church
Massachusetts Avenue at Pleasant Street, with the UU church in the background
A t-shirt in the window of Arlington Centered
Highrock Covenant Church
Robbins Library
Fusion Taste restaurant
Bricks in Robbins Memorial Garden
Citizens Bank parking lot with the post office in the background
Cyclist at the main intersection; Minuteman Bike Path and Arlington Housing Authority building in the background
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History, Photos, Places

Old Burying Ground

The First Parish Unitarian Universalist church in Arlington Center presents a contemporary front to Massachusetts Avenue. According to the church’s website, several churches have stood on that spot since 1739. The current structure was built in the mid-1970s after a fire, and it still looks new and strange for a church, rendered in stark angular white.

The church may be new, but the cemetery behind it predates even that first religious meetinghouse. The Arlington Historical Society’s Ralph D. Sexton reports that residents of old Menotomy designated this location as a burying ground in 1724 and buried its first bodies, mostly children, in 1736. A plaque in the cemetery says it was established 1732.

The Old Burying Ground’s most notable residents are Jason Russell and the 11 other revolutionists whom the British killed during the first day of the American Revolutionary War. A 19-foot-tall granite obelisk marks the location of the stone vault where they are buried. The Old Burying Ground and obelisk appear on Arlington’s town flag/seal, which can be seen on the Multi-War Memorial also in Arlington Center.

Many others who died in the Revolutionary War are buried in this cemetery. Someone has planted small American flags at all the Revolutionary fighters’ graves, as well as one British flag in an empty patch of grass, presumably above the unmarked graves of British soldiers.

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Events, History

Patriots’ Day Parade

Every year on the 3rd Sunday in April, Arlington throws its Patriots’ Day Parade to commemorate the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the first battles of the American Revolutionary War. Minutemen from Menotomy, as the colonists called Arlington at the time, fought in the battle to defend a stockpile of military supplies from the British Army.

Police, firefighters, EMTs, colonial reenactors, musicians, and members of local institutions from Shriners to Girl Scouts to librarians drive or march along Mass Ave from Brattle Square to Linwood Street, throwing candy to spectators, shooting blanks from rifles, or making noise of one kind or another.

This year, the parade passed by Arlington’s Stop and Shop, where striking supermarket workers had been picketing for four days. The workers cheered on the parade and asked vehicles to honk in support of their union.

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