Events, Photos, Places

Harvest Moon Fair

The First Parish Unitarian Universalist church has been an establishment in Arlington for nearly 300 years. And its parishioners have been hosting the annual, autumnal Harvest Moon Fair for at least a century and a half.

Little information is readily available about the fair’s early history, but the fair today has a format familiar to repeat attenders. Sections of the fair, with their hand-lettered calligraphic signs, have become institutions of the event.

A line formed along the front path two hours before the fair started, full of locals and visitors eagerly anticipating the fair’s attractions. Inside, they crowded the nave, buying tickets for the quilt raffle, and looking for deals at the blue table, the Tuck table, the Holly Shop, and “The Buttery” bake sale.

Elsewhere in the church, attendees shopped for used jewelry, electronics, and books. Each type of item had its own dedicated room.

If brownies, cornbread, and cookies from The Buttery weren’t enough to sate their hunger, they bought meal tickets for the “Hole in the Wall” cafe.

This year, a meal ticket bought them access to a Tex-Mex from a buffet. In the late morning, cafe patrons ate to the sound of fiddles from Giulia Haible and Maggie MacPhail, two of the musicians providing entertainment in a cabaret in one corner.

Part flea market, part craft fair, and part bake sale, the Unitarian Universalists make the Harvest Moon Fair possible with their donations of new and used items, homemade food, artistic skill, and time.

The fair’s proceeds support the church, making it possible for them to keep hosting popular events like this one.

Standard
Events, Photos, Places

Arlington Open Studios

2019 marked Arlington Center for the Arts’ 20th annual Open Studios event. Open Studios is a showcase for local artists and craftspeople, many of whom live or work in Arlington, to display and sell their creations. This Open Studios is one of many — community arts organizations in nearby towns, like Somerville, Lexington, and Cambridge, have their own Open Studios events.

This year, the Arlington Center for the Arts (ACA) hosted the event in its new location at 20 Academy Street and next door on Mass Ave at Town Hall. In addition to crafts and fine art, this year’s Open Studios included art demos, performing arts including music and ballet, a poetry reading marathon, and refreshments from Butternut Bakehouse.

Links to the artists’ websites are included below images of their work where possible. Please consider taking a look and patronizing the artists if you’re able.

Photographer Janet Smith shows customers a print.
Baskets by Kimberley Harding, the author’s mother, are arrayed across a table.
Painter Dan Cianfarini poses in front of one of his watercolor landscapes.
Earrings by Lisa Heffley dangle from wire racks.
Ellen Callaway of Callaway Photo poses in front of a photo of rainbow-hued recyclables from her series “Recycled Beauty”.
Embroidery artist Anna Thai works on a huge piece. A scene like this can take weeks to complete.
A woven wire sculpture by metal and fiber artist Sharon Stafford gleams on its shelf.
Visitors look at Louise Musto-Choate‘s acrylic jewelry and cutting boards.
Standard
Events, Photos

Arlington Town Day

September 14th was Arlington’s 2019 Town Day. That’s 43 annual Town Days since 1976, put on by the town to showcase everything Arlington has to offer. This Town Day started at 9:30 in the morning with a flag-raising ceremony on the day’s main stage in front of Arlington’s town hall. Steve Katsos, of ACMi’s Steve Katsos Show, MCed the performances on the main stage, which included Arlington High School’s cheerleaders and jazz band, as well as several bands and a chorus. ACMi recorded the event to broadcast on Arlington’s public TV channel.

Arlington closed Massachusetts Avenue from the Pleasant Street to Jason Street, a stretch of about a third of a mile. Booths lined the street on either side. Restaurant and fast food booths filled the air with the scent of food and fry oil. Clowns, face painters, and carnival game hosts entertained the hundreds of children in attendance. Nonprofits, churches, and town institutions like the police department and ACMi filled some of the booths.

The rest were occupied by businesses ranging from banks and orthodontists to kombucha brewers and martial arts studios. Arlington High School sports teams held a big bake sale to raise money, decorating cupcakes onsite and walking up and down Mass Ave to sell their wares.

The Coast Guard parked a boat in the lot in front of the Robbins Library and taught passersby about water safety; behind the building were pony rides for kids and the library’s annual book sale. Animal Control officer and falconer Diane Welch showed off her birds of prey; behind Town Hall, more approachable animals could be found at the Animal Craze petting zoo.

Beyond the barricades at Pleasant Street in the yard of the Jefferson Cutter House was Arlington’s weekly summer beer garden, hosted by Somerville’s Aeronaut Brewery. Artists had booths in the yard too, selling everything from tie dyed T-shirts to ceramic sponge holders to the beer garden drinkers.

In past years, Arlington has also thrown a Town Night the Friday evening before Town Day, with more carnival games and a fireworks display. In 2018 the Arlington Town Day Committee voted not to host Town Night because it would be too expensive. That year, the Elks Lodge offered to host Town Night, and Arlington resident Katie Garrett raised money to offset the cost of the fireworks. This year, there was no Town Night.

Standard
History, Photos, Places

Spy Pond

On Pond Road off Mass Ave, past a narrow bridge which allows the Minuteman Bikeway to pass overhead, a corrugated concrete boat ramp opens out onto the 103-acre body of water known as Spy Pond. Spy Pond, like Hill’s Pond in Menotomy Rocks Park, is a kettle hole pond, formed in a cavity left behind by a piece of a retreating glacier.

During the 1800s, Spy Pond’s winter ice was a major commodity for Arlington, providing major income for ice shipping businesses and encouraging the development of more infrastructure, including the railroad. Business dropped off in the late 1800s after the introduction of refrigerators, but the pond remained a main recreation spot for locals. The the Arlington Boys and Girls Club has a dock on the water, and Spy Pond Park, with its playground, picnic area, and boat ramp, is open to the public. There’s a parking lot, and if visitors would rather bike, the Bikeway runs right alongside. The town recently started offering canoe and kayak rentals by Spy Pond in the summer.

As of August 2019, the playground was closed for construction. Arlington’s Vision 2020 Spy Pond Committee and the nonprofit organization Friends of Spy Pond Park (FSPP) are working on restoring and maintaining the pond’s health and making improvements to the park. Updates on Spy Pond Park’s status can be found on the Arlington Recreation website.

A privately owned park on the other side of the pond, Kelwyn Manor Park, has a beach, two sports fields, and a playground. The town has two more sports fields: Spy Pond Field by the Boys and Girls Club, and Scannell Field just past Spy Pond Park in the opposite direction.

In addition to being fun for humans, Spy Pond provides food and shelter to many species of birds and fish. It has a bit of a goose problem, and FSPP suggests that visitors should not feed the geese. Elizabeth Island, a 2-acre island in the middle of the pond, remains undeveloped under the care of Arlington Land Trust and is home to native plants and wildlife. Arlington’s cryptid Lizzy (possibly an escaped Komodo Dragon, if she exists at all) is rumored to live there too.

Standard
Events, Places

Feast of the East

This past weekend, Capitol Square threw its 21st annual Feast of the East, an outdoor event to celebrate East Arlington’s community and local businesses. The event takes place along Mass Ave in East Arlington. Mass Ave, Arlington’s main street, stays open during the event; police block off parking lanes for businesses to set up booths in.

The Fox Library kicks off the event with its Fox Festival Parade, after which local brass bands play outside for the rest of the afternoon. Restaurants offer street food from cultures all around the world, and “Kid Zones” around the event have entertainment ranging from clowns to sand art for Arlington’s younger residents.

It’s a great way to spend an early summer day in Arlington.

Standard
Top down view of cartons of strawberries
Events, People

Arlington Farmers’ Market

This Wednesday at 2, the Russell Commons Municipal Lot transformed from Arlington Center’s largest parking lot to a row of booths stocked with goods from fresh tomatoes to refreshing iced tea. The Arlington Farmers’ Market had opened for the season.

In addition to the usual crop of produce, this year’s vendors are offering cheese, handmade pasta, wine and cider, meat, bread, and premade food from local restaurants.

A vendor list is available on the market’s website, and the market is open every Wednesday from 2pm to 6:30pm from mid-June through late October.

Patsy Kraemer, local event organizer, keeps the market running. She took over from Oakes Plimpton, who first opened the market in 1997 and whose other contributions to Arlington and its surroundings include writings about Arlington’s history, a communal garden, and the Boston Area Gleaners.

Patsy Kraemer stands next to hanging pots of flowers at the Dick’s Market Garden booth

On opening day, Kraemer and Plimpton sat in the shade on folding lawn chairs, under a wooden sign labeled “Patsy’s Corner,” chatting amiably and watching as customers filtered in and out of the lot. The market may look different than it did 22 years ago, but the love for local agriculture and sustainable food that drove Plimpton to create it is still going strong.

Standard
Events, Places

Arlington Greek Festival

Every year, Arlington’s St. Athanasius Greek Orthodox Church puts on a festival to celebrate Greek culture: its food, music and dance, religion, and fashion.

Mata Xios Boutique

St. Athanasius’ has been around for 55 years. It was originally located at 735 Mass Ave, which is now the Highrock Covenant Church. The St. Athanasius parish expanded significantly over time as more Greek immigrants and Greek-Americans moved to Arlington; in 2004, the parish moved to 4 Appleton Street, the former home of the St. James the Apostle Roman Catholic Church. A few years later, St. Athanasius’ began throwing its annual festival, using the new location’s sizable parking lot as an event venue.

The church sets up a 60-foot white tent, underneath which are stations selling everything from spanakopita and gyros to loukoumades and baklava, booths selling imported Greek clothing, crafts, jewelry, home goods, and religious items like crosses and nazar pendants.

The festival lasts for four days and features performances by local Greek musicians and dance troops. Some vendors have been coming to the festival for years. Art of the Lands has had a booth at every Arlington Greek Festival for the past decade.

Past the tent on the lawn of Ottoson Middle School, a rental service blows up bouncy castles and inflatable slides.

Other attractions for kids include dance activities and a place to make layered sand art.

Photos from the 2016 Greek Festival by the same photographer can be seen on Flickr here.

Standard