Events, People, Photos

ACAC Artist-in-Residence Plarn Art Project

The soft rustle of plastic newspaper bags fills the basement of the Fox Library. A half-dozen people are sorting them into piles by color. This is the Plarning Brigade, a group of volunteers participating in Arlington Commission for Arts and Culture’s (ACAC) artist-in-residence Michelle Lougee‘s collaborative project.

Brucie Moulton from Sustainable Arlington (L) chats with Lougee (R) as they prep bags for plarn.

Lougee, a sculptor and fiber artist who works in a variety of media, is teaching Arlington residents how to make plastic yarn, or “plarn,” out of newspaper and produce bags, and how to crochet that plarn into three-dimensional, organic-looking shapes. She’s been using post-consumer waste, including plastic bags, as an art material for a decade. Her work explores the tension between nature and humanity, addressing pollution and consumption’s affect on the environment by juxtaposing organic shapes and synthetic materials. Now she’s bringing her skills and perspective to Arlington, where, with her guidance, the Plarning Brigade will produce a large-scale installation.

Sonya pierces the closed ends of yellow newspaper bags so she can crochet them into plarn.

The ACAC has set up plastic bag collection boxes at the Fox Library and the Department of Public Works to gather supplies for the project. The Fox is hosting monthly meetups for the Brigade to work on the installation, and the ACAC is offering a series of workshops around town for those interested to learn the basics and join the Brigade.

“Micro,” an element from Lougee’s installation Ubiquitous (2015) perches in the display case in the Fox Library lobby.
A member of the plarn brigade sorts plastic newspaper bags to turn into plarn.

Arlington Public Art will exhibit the plarn installation on the Minuteman Bikeway as part of its ongoing Pathways initiative, which it started in 2017 to add more creative works to Arlington’s cultural district. Some contributors to Pathways project Ripple, a knitted and crocheted “yarn bomb” installation spearheaded by local artist/activist Adria Arch, are now turning their fiber art skills to plarn for this new project.

Holly crochets plarn.
Lougee (R) shows a volunteer how to crochet plarn.

In addition to adding another exhibit to Pathways, the project contributes to Arlington’s ongoing push for its residents to live more sustainability and reduce plastic waste. With Lougee’s guidance, the Plarning Brigade will keep trash out of the environment and use it to make something beautiful and thought-provoking.

More information about how to join the Plarning Brigade is available on the ACAC’s Arts Arlington website.

Different-sized knobs of blue plarn take shape during the workshop on January 25, 2020.
A “larva” from Lougee’s installation Timber! (2018) rests on the floor.
The colorful ends of newspaper bags litter the floor in the Fox Library community meeting room.
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Events, Photos

Porchfest

Porchfest is an annual music festival that takes place yearly in June, put on by the Arlington Center for the Arts and community volunteers. Local musicians and homeowners sign up to participate, and the organizers match them up so everyone has a porch to play on.

An audience gathers in front of O.T.A’s performance at Menotomy Beer & Wine.

According to Porchfest’s website, last year more than 170 bands performed at the festival. The musicians work in a variety of genres and the festival gradually travels from West to East Arlington over the course of 8 hours. Performance and visual artists showcase their work as well.

Singer-songwriter Laleler plays guitar and sings in East Arlington.

Locals attended the festival in in huge numbers, most walking or biking between porches, many accompanied by their kids and dogs. A few had come from the Pride parade in Boston, which took place earlier the same day, and were sporting rainbow accessories and flags representing sundry LGBTQ+ identities.

In Arlington Center, the Jefferson-Cutter House hosted a beer garden on its lawn, with beer from Aeronaut Brewery, food from local restaurants, and an info booth staffed by ACA volunteers.

(If anyone can identify this band, please comment! They were playing in the beer garden and are not listed on the Porchfest website.)

Right across the street in Uncle Sam Park was Arlington Public Arts’ annual “Chairful Where You Sit” art show, in which the organization raises funds by selling abandoned chairs that artists have rescued, refurbished, and embellished.

Porchfest ended this year with a dance party at Arlington Global Service Station, a gas station collaboratively decorated by its owner Abe Salhi and local artist Johnny Lapham. Street band School of Honk and funk/R&B group Bittersweet Band provided the music.

Porchfests began in Ithaca, NY, and now take place across the country. PorchFest.info has a schedule of New-England-based porchfests. The next is on June 15 on the Boston Fenway.

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