History, Objects, Places

Arlington Reservoir Water Tower

The Arlington Reservoir water tower, not to be confused with the body of water called the Arlington Reservoir, is a water tank at the top of the largest hill in Arlington Heights on the western side of Arlington.

The water tower is located in the middle of Park Circle, a round road that loops around the apex of the Heights’ main hill.

Across the street is one of Arlington’s fire stations.

Paul Schlichtman, member of the Arlington School Committee and webmaster of Arlington-Mass.com, refers to the water tower as the Arlington Standpipe on this page about a tour of the tower (check it out for photos of the tower from 2002!)

Whatever it’s called, the water tower is an architectural and historical landmark for Arlington. It’s been in the National Register of Historic Places since 1985. Plaques on the tower detail its history.

The tower itself has been around since the early 1920s, when Crane Construction Company built it to replace the standpipe-style water tower that had been there since 1895. The 1920s water tower holds about 1,945,000 gallons more water than the original.

The tower’s facade is in the Classical Revival style, a neoclassical architectural style that draws inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman structures. Classical Revival was popular in the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s; its affiliation with the perceived grandeur of classical empires fit well with American national self-perception during the Gilded Age. The water tower’s style can be seen on other 20s landmarks like the Lincoln Memorial.

But mostly, the thing holds water.

Standard
Events, History, Photos, Places

Arlington Reservoir

Arlington’s second-largest body of water, the Arlington Reservoir, is a little different from the others. It was made by people instead of dug out by glaciers. According to the Arlington Reservoir Committee website, Arlington created it in 1871 by damming Munroe Brook. Arlington used the reservoir for drinking water until it joined Massachusetts Water Resources Authority in 1899. This is especially confusing because Arlington’s water tower, which is still active today, is also called the Arlington Reservoir.

The park around the Arlington Reservoir is open year-round, with a trail that leads around the entire body of water. In 2010 the town added a wildlife habitat garden on the spillway, filled with native plants. They’re also fighting an undesirable population of invasive water chestnuts.

Part of the reservoir is swimmable. The town forbids swimming in Hill’s Pond at Menotomy Rocks Park, and Spy Pond’s water quality makes it dangerous to swim in. But the Reservoir Beach, a sandy beach built off the Reservoir’s main body, has filtered water and, during the months it’s open for use, lifeguards.

The Res, as it’s commonly known, lies alongside Lowell Street in Arlington Heights, crossing over the Lexington border. The beach is open from mid-June to late August. The town charges admission, and beachgoers can buy season passes if they desire. There are changing rooms, a snack bar, a playground, and a ramp for wheelchair users to roll into the water.

Recently, at the end of the beach season, the town begun opening the beach for a single ‘Dog Day at the Res’ with Arlington Dog Owners Group. On this day, dog owners from Arlington and beyond can bring their dogs to the beach and into the water. This past Saturday was 2019’s Dog Day.

More information about the Arlington Reservoir may be found on its website here.

Standard